Archive for August, 2012

A Not-Too-Often Breakfast

Posted in bacon, cabbage, eggs, sausage with tags , on August 30, 2012 by oskila

Sunday breakfasts are often lavish (and often brunches or missed entirely). This one from last sunday, I feel, has a hint of Britain and aims to achieve lots of base pleasure with minimal amounts of washing up. It’s a bit on the greasy side though, so your arteries will probably thank you for not having it too often.

Pak choi, sausage and bacon. Three of my most recurring stars, judging from the cloud.

Fry.

When they’re looking good, scrape them onto the side and fry an egg. Sunny side up and overexposed, just the way I like it (actually I like my eggs over easy. Not gonna let that stand in the way of a good punchline though)

Adding the finishing touches, in this case a platoon of toast soldiers. If you’re afraid of cholesterol, you’ll be eating salad for the next two days. If you’re into LCHF you’ll have been naughty, eating all that bread. There’s something in it for everybody!

Groat, Artiodactyl and Underbrush

Posted in bacon, leftovers, wheat with tags on August 29, 2012 by oskila

Here’s a simple dish for when you need to eat, the store’s closed and you’re not really in a hurry, but not in the mood to cook either. The title of the post is not some odd singer/songwriter trio, but the main ingredients.

This is the mainest of ingredients – khorasan wheat. It takes something around 45 minutes to cook, which is why it’s not a good choice of carb when in a hurry. I like to give wheat, rice and similar foods a quick sizzle in a drop of oil before adding water to the pot. Gives a richer flavor.

After putting the wheat on the hob I kind of forgot to take any more pictures before the plating, so I’ll just write some more instead, for example about the other main ingredients. The other main ingredients mentioned in the title are bacon and arugula.

When the wheat was almost done I started frying the bacon, then added the wheat, a bit of garlic and half a teaspoon of the chili sauce I made last time. After letting stuff get cozy for a few minutes I also added what was left in a bag of arugula.

It’s only good and proper to also explain the amount of bacon lately. Bacon’s good of course but why such a lot of it? Well, you see, in Sweden, bacon generally comes in 120-140 gram packs, but I recently realised that my store also has diced bacon in 500 gram trays. Excellent to just have in the freezer and break a corner off the block whenever needed.

And here’s the finished thing! Very basic and simple example of picking and mixing whatever’s available. It also happens to be another five ingredient dinner, which I realised just now…  Those who enjoy cilantro (I don’t) would probably happily use that instead of arugula.

Oh no!

Posted in cabbage with tags on August 27, 2012 by oskila

Balcony agriculture keeps you reasonably safe from slugs, but apparently not from other pests, such as Large White (Pieris brassicae) [sv: kålfjäril], so I will have to harvest all the remaining Pak Choi and freeze it, since one won’t want to eat that much cabbage in one go. It’s detrimental for the social life the following day…

The Treacherous Chili Sauce

Posted in asian, bacon, condiments, noodles, peppers, sauce with tags on August 25, 2012 by oskila

Before going to France, I had bought a small bunch of yellow chili peppers. Fairly mild, but still not something I’d snack on. Just before we left I put them in the freezer, since we’d be away for ten days. Apart from using a small piece for gazpacho I haven’t touched them since and decided it was time to make use what was left.

I decided to do some kind of cold sauce, which could for example be drizzled on top of instant ramen to give it a bit of bite.

Chilies, bereft of their seeds, chopped up and mixed with various spices, vinegar, sugar and a good dollop of mayonnaise (which we all know is good for you). If the combo seems a bit odd, I’ll have you know that the Japanese put mayonnaise on almost anything these days.

I figured this concoction would be a rather docile condiment with a pleasant heat, since the chilies weren’t very strong, but NO, it had somehow become nearly too strong to be amusing. Clearly not something to be had on its own.

So I did what anyone in my position would have done; added ramen and bacon. Clears the sinuses rather well and gives a sense of accomplishment once one has managed to finish eating.

Something on Bratwurst and Cultivars

Posted in condiments, discount, mushroom, pasta, sausage with tags , , on August 18, 2012 by oskila

Today’s dinner isn’t too exciting on account of the cheapskate part of the brain winning over the gourmet part again. But bagging some mushrooms got me thinking of cultivars a bit, since many are surprised that the white button mushrooms are the same species as brown or crimini mushrooms and portobello mushrooms, only different a different color and at a different point in life. For some reason, this isn’t widely known, and the trade name for brown button mushrooms in Sweden is for some reason skogschampinjon (forest button mushroom) which is the Swedish trivial name for the Blushing Wood Mushroom (Agaricus silvaticus), a rather different looking species in many ways. I don’t find this intraspecific variation quite as odd as for example chili- and bell peppers being the same species (the common names in Swedish aren’t as obvious giveaways as the English ones) and it’s even more fascinating that turnip, napa cabbage and pak choi are all cultivars of the same species.

It’s also interesting how domesticated species can revert to a more original state. I vaguely remember a Nazi project to restore the Aurochs, which failed, but produced cattle coloured like the extinct wild ones – cows reddish brown, bulls black with a light eel along the back.

To turn attention back to food – what we had besides the mushrooms was discount sausage (again), supposedly bratwurst, but with today’s production methods and grocery ranges it’s hard to know what exactly constitutes a proper bratwurst.

 

Along with this, also pasta and homemade pesto. And some Parmesan on top of course.

Squashy Noodly Pancakes

Posted in bacon, eggs, leftovers, noodles, squash with tags on August 17, 2012 by oskila

This dish is one of the usual gatherings of leftover odds and ends, but with an attempt to get some variation from the ever resurfacing sausage and rice jumbles.

First, prepare a batch of pancake batter.

Second, get some noodles. These are rice noodles, apparently of Vietnamese origin.

Third, scrounge up some diced bacon, grate half a yellow squash and chop a scallion. Put these in the batter. With all this stuff going into the batter, it’s also an opportunity to go on a seasoning adventure. Garlic and chili is nice, for example.

Give the noodles a quick sizzle, then scoop some batter in on top.

Eventually, it turns into this.

And finally into this. After completing and eating the noodle pancakes I got the feeling that it was a bit familiar. I went to the books, and lo and behold, in Donna Hay’s the New Cook there is a recipe for rice noodle pancakes, but it consists of rice noodles flattened and fried until they retain a disk shape. Further flipping revealed that there’s also a zucchini and Brie pancake recipe in the same book, so I must have combined those two on some sort of subliminal level.

Two Leftovers Enter, One Sandwich Leaves

Posted in leftovers, sandwich, scandinavian with tags , on August 14, 2012 by oskila

With a loaf of bread in the box, getting worse for wear by the minute, but with a texture that gets more awesome with toasting, and a batch of leftover meatballs in the fridge shrinking steadily because of a grazing geek with too many assignments to write, there’s one obvious course of action. Meatball sandwich.

When I was a kid I assumed meatball sandwiches were just a joke, since the meatballs would roll off. (In fact, I just remembered a Blondie strip where Dagwood has exactly that problem)

A Swedish meatball sandwich (now the sandwich is Swedish, not necessarily the meatballs) should also have beetroot salad, with chopped pickled beetroots and crème frâiche or mayo as the main ingredients. I didn’t make any, but it’s not very tricky if you want to.

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