Archive for May, 2013

2 Courgette 4 Egg Omelet

Posted in cheese, discount, eggs, mediterranean, squash, vegetarian, zucchini with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 15, 2013 by oskila

According to Wikipedia, zucchini is the most common used name in Scandinavia for the vegetable in other places more commonly known by its french name courgette. I might have old data, but I think the most widespread name in Sweden at least, is simply squash (probably since we didn’t know about any other squashes for very long and until fairly recently)

I’m only bringing this up since I’m using them in food today. The common green zucchini and the slightly less common golden zucchini. Both were bought fairly cheap and then sort of forgotten in the fridge. Since it’s very unnecessary to let food go bad I needed to make use of them quickly and decided on a Spanish tortilla-like apparition, but with zucchini instead of potatoes.

001 2

Grated zucchinis in a pan, with some oil and salt. A chopped onion was added some time later. Since zucchini is mostly water, it tends to get soggy with cooking, and unless some of the moisture is removed, that sogginess is democratically spread through the whole dish. Leave them in the pan for quite some time to get a proper sear and allow some water to steam away.

002 2

Once that was done I added some seasoning (white pepper, garlic, chili flakes, thyme) and then four lightly beaten eggs and a cup of grated Raclette cheese that happened to be lying around (and at least texture-wise, it’s not entirely unlike the Spanish Manchego). Once that’s taken care of one can choose either to fry fairly quick and flip the whole thing over, or fry it on lower heat and on only one side.

007 2

I decided on a one-sided fry and then a bit of salad.

Advertisements

Spicy Chicken 2 (Murgh Korma, more or less)

Posted in asian, chicken, condiments, indian, rice, sauce, stew, yogurt with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 10, 2013 by oskila

Chicken has only recently been allowed in the kitchen as the significant other softened the bird-eating veto. In combination with the increased comfort in the blending of various spicy spices, this opens up a whole new chapter of cooking, previously unseen in the Nerd Cuisine kitchens.

Not bothering with checking any recipes before cooking, this dish might differ significantly from what other people perceive as proper chicken korma. The spice blend consists mainly of cumin, coriander, turmeric and chili, with smaller amounts of cinnamon, allspice, cloves, sumac, cardamom, nutmeg and ginger.

Ingredients beside chicken include onions, carrots, tomato paste, broccoli (which is a bit out of place I admit, but needed eating) and thick yogurt. Deducing from the recipes I looked at afterwards, it’s far more common to base the sauce on cream.

008 2

Somewhat disorganized photo of the described korma dish with rice, naan and kheere ka raita.

Spicy Chicken 1

Posted in broccoli, chicken, couscous, mediterranean, wheat with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 9, 2013 by oskila

For nearly three years I’ve lived under the delusion that my significant other disliked couscous. Apparently that is not the case, so to celebrate I made some with spicy chicken.

The spice blend aimed to be something that could be associated with North Africa. I don’t remember everything I put in there off the top of my head, but paprika, cumin, cardamom and cinnamon were major players.

004 2

Spicy chicken stew with carrots and broccoli, couscous and cold sauce of a curry-flavored persuasion. Only one photo today, as I didn’t find the dish blogworthy until I started fiddling with plating.

 

Fast Food, Only Slow…

Posted in leftovers, mediterranean, pork, side dish with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 1, 2013 by oskila

We didn’t even eat half the roast of the last post for dinner that night. I didn’t feel like just slicing and re-heating it. After some thinking I realized that the Greek fast food dish gyros is usually made with pork neck. The name comes from the broiling on a rotating spit of course, but you can’t get all the details right just for the sake of it. Pan fried is totally nice too.

002 2

Having previously roasted the meat once, it’s much easier to slice it thinly before frying – and considering that nice pink, it badly needs frying.

001 2

Fantasized up a nice seasoning mix, mostly from memory of previously encountered Greek food and a bit of logical reasoning. Equal parts ground coriander seeds, cumin, chili powder/paprika, dried parsley and dried garlic along with half-measures of black pepper, thyme, oregano, rosemary and sumac. Also added a dash of cinnamon after comparing to recipes found online (although most of them, except notably the one in the Wikipedia article on gyros, suggested adding as much cinnamon as oregano, which I suspect would be an overpowering amount)

003 2

Give the seasoning mix a quick sizzle before adding the meat to the pan. (Most of the cooking fat is rendered piggy lard from the roasting dish)

004 2

To fully imitate proper gyros, the frying has to go on for quite some time since the meat should be bordering on overcooked and charred. I kept the meat in the pan for almost the whole time it takes to cook prefab French fries in the oven (20 minutes).

005 2

There was also some tzatziki left from last time. All things considered a really nice dish just like the ones from the fast food joints, with slightly healthier fries since they’re baked instead of deep fried and slightly less healthy meat since it’s fried in considerable amounts of fat instead of broiled. And there are four more pounds of pork neck in the freezer…

Someone complained yesterday that I don’t pay enough attention to the finished dishes in my blog posts. I’ve tried to come up with more than the above paragraph, and I realize that it’s simply not my forte. I often enjoy cooking the food slightly more than eating it I think, and by the time I’ve come to the presented plate of food-part of the blog posts I mostly want it over and done with.

%d bloggers like this: