Archive for the eggs Category

When In Doubt; Ramen

Posted in asian, eggs, japanese, noodles, pork, soup, stock with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 18, 2016 by oskila

I think I might have triggered myself with the last post… Here’s an actual dish.

Went to seldom visited grocery store. Found soft ramen noodles and big bottle of inexpensive fish sauce. Cogs started turning again.

Fast forward a few days and found myself without dinner late at night after struggling considerably with putting the child to bed (and falling asleep myself)

A vision of Tonkotsu Ramen noodle soup appeared for my inner vision. Problem is, while it’s street food in Japan, the broth alone takes over 12 hours to prepare and the eggs at least four. So I had to wing it and cheat.


In a pot I combined finely sliced onion, carrot and ramsons (aka wild garlic), a handful of edamame beans and a small amount of ground up dried mushrooms. A cup of chicken stock followed, seasoned with soy sauce, mirin and fish sauce.

Broth brought to a simmer I added paper thin slices of brined pork neck that I had set aside while making pulled pork the night before.

In another pot an egg was boiled for six minutes and then fished out and peeled while the noodles cooked in the same water for two minutes.

Noodles transferred to bowl, broth poured over, egg sliced and plopped on top (without marinating for four hours), various condiments sprinkled.


While obviously a weak, adulterated shadow of the real thing, I found this bowl of food incredibly tasty. Further attempts to home in on the original are in pipeline.

Three year celebration

Posted in dairy, eggs, italian with tags , , , , , , , on October 22, 2014 by oskila

The little wordpress notification gnome just told me it’s three years since I registered nerdcuisine.wordpress.com! How time flies… Regular readers (if any are left) have noticed a decline in activity over the last year or so. Baby Olivia says hi :)

There’s an obvious need for some kind of celebratory action, but I don’t have any material for a proper recipe post, so here’s just a pretty nice picture from last week of panna cotta with home made strawberry jam.

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The picture is also available from my all new instagram page

That’s it for this time. Hopefully the next year will have more regular posting. Thanks for hanging around!

Bacon and Eggs. And Mushrooms. And Rice Noodles and Ssamjang. And Kimchi?

Posted in asian, bacon, cabbage, condiments, eggs, korean, leeks, mushroom, noodles, preserve, salad, side dish with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 3, 2013 by oskila

OK. New food instead of backlog, because I want to, and I can do what I want with my blog. I started out by trying to figure out dinner and found eggs and bacon. Then I found a couple of mushrooms at the back, along with a leek. Reaching for the granulated garlic in the cupboard next to the fridge I saw the new rice noodles. While the kettle was on to make noodle water I checked the fridge again and found the trusty old ssamjang and the spanking new packet of kimchi. Behind the kimchi I found the cabbage I pickled myself some time ago (back in March).

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Fried all the fryable stuff and tossed it together, then put some proper kimchi next to my ko-jaeng-i stuff. I have to say my feeble attempt is rather good considering I hadn’t tried the real stuff before making it. For future reference, this real kimchi is a bit less sour, a lot less sweet and heaps, plenty, lots spicier. I hear Koreans eat kimchi for breakfast and I secretly hope the breakfast variety has a bit less chili in it. On that bombshell we end tonight’s post :)

2 Courgette 4 Egg Omelet

Posted in cheese, discount, eggs, mediterranean, squash, vegetarian, zucchini with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 15, 2013 by oskila

According to Wikipedia, zucchini is the most common used name in Scandinavia for the vegetable in other places more commonly known by its french name courgette. I might have old data, but I think the most widespread name in Sweden at least, is simply squash (probably since we didn’t know about any other squashes for very long and until fairly recently)

I’m only bringing this up since I’m using them in food today. The common green zucchini and the slightly less common golden zucchini. Both were bought fairly cheap and then sort of forgotten in the fridge. Since it’s very unnecessary to let food go bad I needed to make use of them quickly and decided on a Spanish tortilla-like apparition, but with zucchini instead of potatoes.

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Grated zucchinis in a pan, with some oil and salt. A chopped onion was added some time later. Since zucchini is mostly water, it tends to get soggy with cooking, and unless some of the moisture is removed, that sogginess is democratically spread through the whole dish. Leave them in the pan for quite some time to get a proper sear and allow some water to steam away.

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Once that was done I added some seasoning (white pepper, garlic, chili flakes, thyme) and then four lightly beaten eggs and a cup of grated Raclette cheese that happened to be lying around (and at least texture-wise, it’s not entirely unlike the Spanish Manchego). Once that’s taken care of one can choose either to fry fairly quick and flip the whole thing over, or fry it on lower heat and on only one side.

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I decided on a one-sided fry and then a bit of salad.

My Big Fat Swedish Pancake

Posted in bacon, eggs, pancakes, scandinavian, vegetarian with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 8, 2013 by oskila

After a bit of surfing around I came to the conclusion that baking pancakes in the oven is a quite local Swedish/Finnish thing, with oven pancakes more often being served as a main dish and ‘normal’ pancakes for dessert. This only came up because we had one for dinner yesterday and I’d be interested to know whether similar dishes occur in other parts of the world. Also, since I’m given to understand that pancake batters are different in different places I’m going to include an actual list of ingredients, with measurements, which is pretty close to a first.

I’ve always been a bit skeptic about oven pancakes, probably because of the ones served in school cafeterias (commonly known as wrestling mats) but homemade ones are clearly much better (ooh, surprise…)

Oven pancake batter (serves 2-3)

600 ml milk

300 ml wheat flour

½ teaspoon of salt

3 eggs

A standard recipe contains just the above (and can also be used for pan-fried Swedish pancakes) but I have to be different of course, so I’d suggest adding a small amount of fat, like oil or butter, and half a teaspoon or so of baking soda.

Mix everything together thoroughly and pour into a greased baking tray or ample size dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes at 225 C. Serve with jam.

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This particular pancake has some bacon in it and is served with a sprinkle of leeks and blueberry jam. I would have wanted the leeks in the batter as well, but the oven pancake aficionado of the household vetoed that. You can put all kinds of stuff in the batter though. Carrots, apples or berries would probably be nice.

Mongolian Style Pork Loin

Posted in asian, discount, eggs, pork, rice, sauce, squash with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2013 by oskila

Read about Mongolian food in the newspaper and became a bit interested. Thought about the article for a couple of days and then decided to try cooking something that more or less resembled that particular cuisine. A bit of googling around hints that this dish may or may not actually be authentic, but could be a Chinese impression of what Mongolians eat or a westernized version. The recipe in the paper was intended for beef – i have no idea whether just substituting beef for pork will be odd or not.

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The marinade, which is the significant part of this type of food, I’d say. It contains dark soy sauce, sugar, an egg, rice vinegar, oil, powdered chili peppers, baking soda and tapioca starch. The recipe also called for hoisin sauce, but I made my own instead combining ssamjang, Worcestershire sauce and powdered garlic. I have no idea what the baking soda is for, possibly something about crunchiness. The original recipe also called for grated ginger, which I didn’t have.

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Strips of pork go in marinade. Longer is better, preferrably at least an hour.

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These three are the rest of the dish, apart from rice. Carrots are nearly always cheap and the spring onions and zucchinis were this week.

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While the meat is marinating, fry the vegetables for a bit. Mushrooms would probably be good too. Mixing everything together in the same pan could end up chaotic and ugly-looking since the marinade contains egg and starch and would likely stick to everything.

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Put vegetables aside and stir-fry the meat. This is too much meat for one pan really. It’d been better to use two pans or fry twice. The recipe said to fry quickly over high heat, but they used beef and not pork, so I had to be a bit more careful.

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A bowl of supposedly Mongolian pork, some vegetables and rice. Had the meat and marinade been prepared say the day before, the cooking part had been really quick, which lunch-box improvisers like me appreciate.

Eight Minute Lunch Box

Posted in asian, condiments, eggs, noodles, okra, vegetarian with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 15, 2013 by oskila

Tram to work leaves in half an hour, you forgot to pack lunch the night before and the takeaway opportunities at work are sketchy at best? Fear not. Do like this:

1. Put on kettle with just enough water to soften a block of noodles.

2. Heat a pan

3. Chop some garlic sprouts and put in pan with oil. Add some kind of spice that benefits from a bit of sizzling, like Sichuan pepper.

4. Toss some frozen okra in the same pan. Be careful, because the oil will not like this at all and end up everywhere.

5. When the kettle is boiling, pour water over noodles in bowl.

6. Keep stirring pan.

7. Drain noodles and add to pan. Season some more.

8. When the sear on the okra is satisfactory, scrape everything into a box.

9. Fry an egg and put in the box.

10. Finishing touches such as condiments.

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The lunch in all its glory. I got hold of some Taiwanese wheat noodles that are spinach flavored according to the label, but only contain flour, water, salt and food coloring E102 and E133. Those colorants happen to be Tartrazine and Brilliant Blue FCF, both of which are synthesized from petroleum and may be harmful to people with allergies or asthma (And therefore used to be forbidden in Sweden until the EU made a fuss) The two condiment dollops are ssamjang (top) and sambal oelek (bottom).

All of this can be done inside eight minutes. Remove the egg (and perhaps add more vegetables) and you’ll have a vegan lunch instead.

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