Archive for the beef Category

Summer Memories: Skirt Steak and Halloumi

Posted in beef, cheese, condiments, mushroom with tags , , , , , , , on October 2, 2013 by oskila

Working through the backlog some more. Another dinner which involves barbecue activities, but this time it’s about the (in Sweden) elusive skirt steak or bavette as the french call it. Used to be cheap, but now it’s fashionable and in demand.

bavette 1

Yours truly, monitoring the skirt steak and mushrooms, in yet another photographic appearance. I normally barbecue stuff with indirect heat and the lid on, but my dear wife whipped out the phone camera when the lid was off.

Meat was bought sligthly brined, but otherwise only seasoned with salt and pepper. Mushrooms were gradually smothered in home made dry rub.

bavette2

Mushrooms, skirt steak and halloumi. We were apparently hungry enough to forget to snap a shot of  a plate.  I assume we also had potatoes and sauce bearnaise or similar.

Blog just had a birthday! (and more noodles)

Posted in asian, asparagus, beef, eggs, leeks, leftovers, noodles, soup with tags on October 21, 2012 by oskila

October 19th 2011, I migrated a blog post from nerdcuisine.blogspot.com to nerdcuisine.wordpress.com. It’s been a year. That’s awesome. Since then, I’ve gotten a firmer grasp on editing blogs, on cooking and photographing certain types of food and probably also the English language (which wasn’t that bad to begin with). Thank you everyone who has contributed to the just over 3000 views over the course of the first year. Hopefully you’ve liked what you’ve seen!

That’s enough celebration. I’ve once again returned from the self-imposed exile, which is still needed since I’m not done with my backlog of school assignments yet, to post a little recipe as to not have the blog grow over completely and my cooking skills wither away under the yoke of take away. Just like ever so often before, the dish at hand is a collection of odds and ends and noodles. Also, there’s only one photo, which means more writing practice and less picture editing.

Today’s ingredients are:

Small pieces of cold cut roast beef, left over from sandwich making.
Flat wheat noodles.
Duck-flavored seasoning from a bag of instant ramen (ramen previously used without seasoning).
A bit of leek, thinly sliced
Half a stalk of green asparagus, which must have rolled off the cutting board during the preparation of Friday’s dinner only to be found again while cutting leek.
Chili flakes
An egg

Meat and asparagus was chopped up and boiled in a broth made from the ramen seasonings (powder and oil) to soften a bit. Then noodles and leeks were added and cooking continued until noodles were fairly soft. With solids removed from broth, the broth was allowed to reduce some while the other stuff had a quick sizzle in a pan, into which the egg was cracked after some time. Contents of pan put in bowl, broth poured over, chili flakes sprinkled. Egg congeals, food is eaten. That is all.

Five Ingredient Dinner – Fried Rice with Sirloin

Posted in asian, beef, rice with tags , on June 27, 2012 by oskila

Neither this dish or the Five Ingredient Lunch was conceived or cooked with a five ingredient shtick in mind, but I guess it’s a reasonable number of flavours and textures to put in food if it’s not to be too messy on the palate. Actually, what I really mean is five main components, since ingredients should also include for example salt, pepper, water and oil. This has kindly been pointed out to me by people who are as nitpicking and obnoxious as me, so I’ll just smile and wave and claim artistic liberty.

As you can see, this photo has plenty of motion blur, because the little red compact camera and I have different opinions on how photography is best carried out. The ingredients are: shredded beef sirloin, which has been marinated in a mix of soy, water, garlic and vinegar, rice, carrots, red onion, green chili pepper.

Rice is in the pot, meat drained of surplus marinade, and I simply can’t help but like pictures of prepared ingredients on cutting boards. Especially when the cutting was done with a lovely Japanese knife – a knife that’s so sharp I won’t use it when I’m in a hurry.

The carrots are the crunchiest ingredient, so they fry first.

Adding onions and chilies.

Adding meat. Sirloin of beef bought shredded like this is of course the trimmed off pieces of a proper steak, but a good way for stores and suppliers to minimize waste as well as a neat way for cheapskates like me to get good meat at reasonable prices, since a tray of shredded meat like this comes at less than half the price of a whole piece of sirloin of equal weight. There’s no point in trying to cook these thin shreds medium; focus on getting  a good sear and the marinade will keep the meat reasonably juicy anyway.

Long time readers (if there are any, I’m not sure) will have noticed that I often mix everything in rice dishes. I think it’s a good way to spread flavour around and get the rice a bit more interesting. It does seldom look very posh, but elegance isn’t the only way for a dish to appeal visually.

Then again, with a bit of effort, the completed dish can still look fairly posh.

Sandwich for Lunch

Posted in beef, bread, cabbage, potato, sandwich with tags , on March 27, 2012 by oskila

Happened to come across a fairly cheap piece of sirloin around lunchtime, so I decided to try my hand at a steak sandwich. Hardly anything worth posting on a blog? Well, I had to come up with something blogworthy, so the clever thing with my little sandwich is that everything – bread, steak and potato chips – are fried in the same grill pan in rapid succession.

1. Fry a slice of bread. Rub with garlic.

2. Put meat in pan. In the meantime, put onion on bread and whip up a bowl of coleslaw.

3. Remove meat and let rest.

4. Put sliced leftover potatoes in pan just to get a bit of searing. They were already boiled, see.

5. Slice meat and put everything together.

With a bit more thinking beforehand I could have added some more typical steak sandwich ingredients like cheese, mustard or horseradish, but I’m quite happy with the the result.

Chinese Beef Stew – a relapse into Asia

Posted in asian, beef, cabbage, rice, stew with tags , on February 7, 2012 by oskila

I seem to recall that I’ve hinted about making too much ‘Asian’ food (it was probably the herring), but yesterday I watched Kung Fu Panda for the first time which left me with a hankering.

Chinese food in Sweden is basically one man’s wo(r)k since almost all the Chinese restaurants I’ve visited in Sweden copied their menu from the first one, opened in Gothenburg 1961. As a result, Swedish Chinese food is probably a whole lot blander than the Guangdong kitchens it originated in. My recipe today aims to draw the best from the Swedish Chinese food culture and add a bit of me to the mix.

Ingredients! Beef, mushrooms, leek, carrot, red cabbage. There’s other stuff too, but I didn’t put it in the picture because I had done a lot of stuff already when I decided to take photos. The beef has been marinated in a mixture of soy, white wine, oil, garlic and powdered chili.

Rice is already done. Meat, shroom and carrot is sizzling away and the small pot holds a broth made from beef stock cube and the marinade.

Broth goes in pan to simmer along for a while. Even though I cut the meat rather thin, round steak is a tough cut of beef and would probably not have objected to a longer (upwards of 30 minutes) simmer on its own. The leeks should be popped in at last minute to achieve heat but not sog.

Since the lady I love has Views on the edibility of red cabbage I blanched it separately in the rest of the broth, instead of adding it to the pan.

To thicken the fluids, add some arrowroot dissolved in cold water and bring to boil again.

The completed dish. With a more tender cut of beef it can be done inside 15 minutes (the time it takes to cook rice). Also keep in mind that the red cabbage will stain everything purple, so use dark soy for better color if you’re going to copy the recipe straight up. I’m not up to date on how common red cabbage is in China, but the green variety is probably more widespread.

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