Archive for bacon

Baconated Dumplings

Posted in asian, cabbage, chinese, condiments, mushroom, pork, sauce, scallion, wheat with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 29, 2015 by oskila

The local grocery store suddenly started selling bamboo steamers, so I decided to try my hand at wonton dumplings, which are commonly steamed.

The dough is easy enough. According to the recipe I looked at, one should combine wheat flour with boiling water to produce a soft dough that doesn’t stick too much.

Traditional wonton filling usually includes pork. I had recently landed a considerable amount of bacon, which is technically pork. Also used were savoy cabbage, spring onions, wood ear mushroom and Chinese five-spice.

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The resulting dumplings might not be the prettiest ones you’ve seen, but not too shabby for a rushed first attempt.

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While the dumplings steamed away I attempted some kind of sweet and sour sauce based on rice vinegar and canned pineapple without looking too closely at actual recipes.

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Dumplings post steam. While they turned out quite nice, it’s entirely possible that I failed with the dough on account of them sticking to the steamer like if glued.

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Finished dumplings and sauce along with store-bought tamarind/date sauce that is more of an Indian persuasion than Chinese (but tasty) and a sprinkle of chopped spring onions.

Blog aten’t dead! Four years celebration

Posted in bacon, cheese, vegetables, venison with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 26, 2015 by oskila

All this faffing about with having an actual job or staying at home with the sprogget steals valuable time from food blogging. I’m doing my best to stay above surface, but it’s tricky.

As it turns out, the blog turned four last week, which I noticed, but didn’t find time to post about. We’ll have to do with this week instead.

The trusty local food grocer announced ground venison at a discount and while patty isn’t my middle name, I’m drawn to the opportunity like a feegle to scumble. (Read more Pratchett if you didn’t get the reference).

Venison is typically lean meat, so bacon is always a good addition. A side dish of Feta-gratinated beets also made their way into the picture.

Mix venison with an egg, salt, pepper and possibly a ground up juniper berry or two. Shape into patties and wrap in bacon.

Beetroots boiled until soft, then peeled, sliced and put in a dish. Feta sprinkled. Bake until browned or somesuch. Experimentation with garlic, honey, sunflower seeds or the like is encouraged.hjort

Onwards to another year. I’ll stop promising improvement, but one can hope…

Also, new camera!

Chowder-like Smoky Salvage Soup

Posted in alaska pollock, american, bacon, beans, discount, leeks, potato, shellfish, soup with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 1, 2013 by oskila

An awful lot of time has gone by since the last post. I’m very sorry for that, and I have a big backlog of meals to blog about. Today’s dish, however, is hot from the stove. (not really, since it’s probably three-four hours since I actually ate it for dinner)

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When my wife’s aunt and uncle moved to Copenhagen they gave away quite a lot of food that wouldn’t keep for the trip over to Denmark anyway. Among the things we were given were a tin of smoked mussels, something I felt we’d probably never use. Until I read some stuff about clam chowder. The soup I’m making today is probably breaking all kinds of clam chowder rules, but that’s never bothered me in the past. I didn’t feel like a big round of shopping, so I used up stuff I found. Ye olde crustacean stock, frozen alaska pollock up the seaworthy proteins a bit, bacon, cos at least it’s never made a dish worse, ever, creme fraiche with herbs instead of cream, because it was expires-tomorrow-cheap, some old frozen fries and some leek.

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Bacon, leeks and diced fries are the first to go in my new nice cast iron pot, along with some white pepper and powdered garlic. Any chowder purists among the regular readers have probably un-followed by now, but in hindsight I couldn’t tell if the potatoes in the soup was hand-peeled and diced, or simply chopped up fries. It’s not cheaper at all, but handy if you’re in a pinch.

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As I added the still frozen stock, the diced fish and the mussels (it’s damn silly, by the way, that the same Swedish company that used to can 1500 tons of locally sourced mussels annually now ships them from Chile instead. Not very sustainable I’d think) second thought struck, and I also added a handful of green beans and a pinch of paprika.

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Good food, but crappy photo. Added water, a bit of milk to counter the rather high saltiness, a dash of lemon juice in lieu of white wine and, after bringing the pot to a boil, the creme fraiche.

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The final result is a soup with quite a few chowder-like qualities, that I hope at least a quite hungry Mainer would agree to eat. And it feels great to be back in the food blog business.

My Big Fat Swedish Pancake

Posted in bacon, eggs, pancakes, scandinavian, vegetarian with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 8, 2013 by oskila

After a bit of surfing around I came to the conclusion that baking pancakes in the oven is a quite local Swedish/Finnish thing, with oven pancakes more often being served as a main dish and ‘normal’ pancakes for dessert. This only came up because we had one for dinner yesterday and I’d be interested to know whether similar dishes occur in other parts of the world. Also, since I’m given to understand that pancake batters are different in different places I’m going to include an actual list of ingredients, with measurements, which is pretty close to a first.

I’ve always been a bit skeptic about oven pancakes, probably because of the ones served in school cafeterias (commonly known as wrestling mats) but homemade ones are clearly much better (ooh, surprise…)

Oven pancake batter (serves 2-3)

600 ml milk

300 ml wheat flour

½ teaspoon of salt

3 eggs

A standard recipe contains just the above (and can also be used for pan-fried Swedish pancakes) but I have to be different of course, so I’d suggest adding a small amount of fat, like oil or butter, and half a teaspoon or so of baking soda.

Mix everything together thoroughly and pour into a greased baking tray or ample size dish. Bake for 20-30 minutes at 225 C. Serve with jam.

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This particular pancake has some bacon in it and is served with a sprinkle of leeks and blueberry jam. I would have wanted the leeks in the batter as well, but the oven pancake aficionado of the household vetoed that. You can put all kinds of stuff in the batter though. Carrots, apples or berries would probably be nice.

A quick one on salad

Posted in bacon, eggs, pasta, salad with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 6, 2013 by oskila

I’m thinking there’s going to be an increase in food photographed in plastic boxes since I only eat school food on Thursdays (and have no scheduled lunch at all on Fridays)

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Here, a kind of salad, made with the first chicory I’ve ever bought, elbow macaroni, hard boiled egg and diced bacon. Dressed with mayo and a bit of mango vinegar. Whipped up, boxed and brought to work in less than ten minutes (the commute to work is 40-50 minutes though)

Becoming a Cabbage-Head: The Accidental LCHF Lunch

Posted in bacon, cabbage, stew with tags , , , , , , , , on February 4, 2013 by oskila

Those who read this blog regularly may have noticed that there’s cabbage involved quite often. I think I’m becoming a cabbage-head. This time it’s mostly because the Savoy cabbage was cheap and the creamed kale of the second last post turned out so very awesome.

LCHF is a diet which I’m not committed to, but this dish sneaks in under the radar, containing nothing too carby.

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This is where this post started. Savoy cabbage. It’s a lot more interesting than ordinary green cabbage in my opinion. A fuller, more characteristic flavour. It came at a fairly good price and I needed lunch.

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Also relevant is this onion here. If it’s actually a shallot it’s the largest one I’ve ever seen.

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Boil shredded cabbage in bouillon of your choice for about 10 minutes, then rinse in cold water and drain before searing it along with finely chopped onion in a bit of butter. Then add salt or some of the cooking liquid, white pepper and nutmeg and a good helping of cream. Let it simmer until stewy. Fry up some bacon separately.

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Lunch! Many of the LCHF followers I’ve met eat bacon like there’s no tomorrow, but I strongly suspect that there’s some sugar involved in the curing process. Chucked the packaging before I could check. Either way there’s a considerable amount of sodium in this dish if you’re scared of that sort of thing. I was mostly after an easy, tasty meal that could withstand a night in the fridge and a couple of minutes in a microwave oven the next day. It’s not a very large helping of food as lunches go, but since it’s pretty fatty it doesn’t have to be a lot to keep one full for the rest of the working day.

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