Archive for fish

Summer Memories: Restaurant Fish

Posted in mushroom, sweetbreads, zander with tags , , , , , , , , on October 4, 2013 by oskila

‘This post title is even odder than usual’ you might think upon reading it. It’s there because today’s post is about restaurant food instead of my own cooking, and that I only very seldom order fish in restaurants.

The post is based on the photo, which I rediscovered while flipping through phone and pad. It was taken during the most expensive lunch I’ve had in my life, eaten while on a road-trip to celebrate my parents’ wedding anniversary.

zander

Pan-fried zander with chanterelles and breaded veal sweetbreads.

Zander is an awesome fish. Very tasty, and as far as I can tell, it’s quite sustainable for the time being. Sweetbreads aren’t quite for me though.

Smoked Salmon Hash

Posted in peppers, potato, scandinavian, smoked salmon, vegetarian with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 16, 2013 by oskila

There’s been quite a long silence, for quite good reasons if I might say so myself. I got married on June 1st (which was preceded by a lot of nervousness and preparations) and then went honeymooning in New York for a bit over a week. The trip will be elaborated upon once I’ve sorted through the 900+ pictures.

Swedish hash, or pyttipanna, is made by frying neatly diced potatoes and leftover meats along with chopped onions. We were a bit short in the leftover meats department but had some smoked salmon that we got from my wife’s aunt, who was clearing out her fridge.

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In one pan, onions, fried over medium heat until brown. I added some garlic and red peppers to keep the salmon more company.

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In a second pan, potatoes, along with a sprig of thyme.

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Once everything is more or less cooked, the salmon can be added. It really doesn’t need a lot of pan time, already being smoked.

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Potatoes tipped in too. Time to season and stir.

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Pyttipanna is traditionally served with fried eggs and pickled beets (and in recent times often with ketchup and similar) but I decided to manage without.

Defacing Fish Soup

Posted in asian, cabbage, crossover, fish sticks, noodles, soup, stock, vegetarian with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 22, 2013 by oskila

Today’s dish is a very fishy soup. I was trying to think up something that would involve the Hong-Kong style shrimp noodles that had found their way into my kitchen. I didn’t feel like going to the store again to get proper fish, so I dug some fish sticks out of the freezer.

sticks

Just putting straight up fish sticks in a soup would quite likely be a horrible experience, so I quickly fried them and peeled the breading off (It’s the breading that’s good anyway). When I was a kid, fish sticks were white on the inside, but I guess that with Atlantic cod population plummeting, pollock or something was a better alternative.

veggies

These noodles are wheat noodles flavored with a bit of shrimp. New to me, but seem tasty. Here they are cooked and put in a bowl together with Chinese cabbage, carrots and garlic sprouts. (Yes, there’s been a lot of cabbage and sprouts recently, but that’s what happens when one wants to use everything up)

fish

Former fish sticks sitting in a pot of boiled broth containing katsuobishi dashi (made from fish flakes) and a dash of rice vinegar. After a while the pieces started to float, so I assumed that they were done, especially since they already had been cooked once.

soup

Pot tipped into bowl and soup done.

Guest Post

Posted in herring, scandinavian with tags , , , , , , , , on February 9, 2013 by oskila

A couple of weeks before Christmas I had the opportunity to write a guest post for the rather awesome food blog rantingchef.com. Since Christmas was just around the bend at the time, I chose a Swedish Christmas classic – pickled herring. Due to the immense amount of bloggers who wanted to contribute, my post missed Christmas by more than a month, but one could use the time left until the next one to hunt down a supplier of herring and experiment with the recipes.

And after you’ve read my wall of text on curing, soaking and pickling herring, be sure to check out the rest of the blog. As I said before; it’s rather awesome!

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