Archive for lunch

Pulled Some More Pork

Posted in american, condiments, leftovers, pork, potato with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 8, 2013 by oskila

My brother came over the other day and since he hadn’t had dinner he went to the store for food to cook at our place. He returned with a piece of pork shoulder, shaped like a fillet, and marinated in orange and ginger and also some potatoes and a bottle of ready made red wine sauce. He only cooked and ate half of it, so I had the rest for lunch the next day.

Since both my previous attempts mainly involved an oven and nearly whole days of cooking, I knew I had to change method or have something else for lunch. The choice fell on the cast iron pot that’s been heavily featured recently. I tipped the rest of the red wine sauce in, along with a bit of water, pork stock, sugar and half an onion in slices. Simmered the meat, which wasn’t as large as the big chunks of pork neck I’ve used before, for about two hours

Both this step and the next would have had really nice pictures, if the camera hadn’t messed the files up. (My trusty DSLR does become a bit iffy from time to time.  It’s about 10 years old.)

Next step was to rub the cooked meat with a new batch of dust, basicall same as the old one but with muscovado sugar instead of regular and some Sichuan pepper and English mustard powder added to spice things up a bit. Then half an hour in the oven at 150 C (300 F) to get a bit of bark going.

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Pork pulled and camera working again.

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The remains of the simmering part.

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Meat reheated in a pan with a dollop of homemade barbecue sauce. It had time to go cold due to slightly poor planning with the garnish and all the fiddling with the camera.

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Comparatively quick pulled pork with refried potatoes and some onions and romaine lettuce

Yellowfoot Lunch

Posted in italian, mushroom, pasta, pork, sauce, stew with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 6, 2013 by oskila

It would seem this year doesn’t offer a lot of time to go mushroom hunting. Apart from the stuff happening at home, having to work an actual job five days a week is unexpectedly tiring. In years like this, it’s always nice to know when yellowfoot season starts. That is, store-bought yellowfoot.

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The yellowfoot mushroom is one of my favourites. It’s abundant (if you know where to look), easy to dry, flavorful and texturally pleasing. If bought it’s also usually cheaper than the other non-farmed mushrooms. (We usually get farmed button, portobello, shiitake and oyster mushrooms and golden chanterelle and sometimes yellowfoot and trumpet of death when they’re in season)

The other principal ingredients of today’s dish are pork loin, cut into strips, creme fraiche and chopped onions and leeks.

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Dry frying the mushrooms for a bit before adding fat.

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Sweating onions and leeks together with mushrooms, while the meat sears in a separate vessel.

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Meat and a whiff of flour goes into the pot. Add a liquid of choice if the pot starts to go dry. I added a bit of stock and then some milk.

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With the stew in a more agreeable mood, season and add the creme fraiche. I often use creme fraiche because, while as fat as double cream, its acidity makes it a bit lighter than heavy, cream-based sauces. Simmer for a while, the longer the better. In hindsight a bay leaf would have been nice.

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In the meantime, some friendly friend has prepared pasta and a salad (actually, it was me, but hey). Slightly fancier than the average saturday lunch, but we had a friend (who was also our wedding photographer) over for lunch and were in the mood for a bit of fancy.

Summer Memories: Restaurant Fish

Posted in mushroom, sweetbreads, zander with tags , , , , , , , , on October 4, 2013 by oskila

‘This post title is even odder than usual’ you might think upon reading it. It’s there because today’s post is about restaurant food instead of my own cooking, and that I only very seldom order fish in restaurants.

The post is based on the photo, which I rediscovered while flipping through phone and pad. It was taken during the most expensive lunch I’ve had in my life, eaten while on a road-trip to celebrate my parents’ wedding anniversary.

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Pan-fried zander with chanterelles and breaded veal sweetbreads.

Zander is an awesome fish. Very tasty, and as far as I can tell, it’s quite sustainable for the time being. Sweetbreads aren’t quite for me though.

We’re frying salad now?

Posted in asian, cabbage, meatballs, rice with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 20, 2013 by oskila

Here in Sweden, Chinese cabbage (or nappa cabbage, or napa cabbage) is mostly encountered in a salad bowl, but in Korea it’s commonly used for kimchi (i.e. fermented and spiced) and in China the seeds are pressed for cooking oil. It’s also used in stir fries in many stir-frying countries, something which seems pretty far fetched to a Swedish palate.

I had to try it of course and whipped up a lunch box, containing fried rice, garlic sprouts and Chinese cabbage. In the end I added some prefab meatballs to get more protein in there. It wasn’t bad at all and I recognized the texture, so I think I must have had it on occasion in a box of Thai or Chinese take-away.

Super ugly phone photo today, because I was in a hurry.

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Eight Minute Lunch Box

Posted in asian, condiments, eggs, noodles, okra, vegetarian with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 15, 2013 by oskila

Tram to work leaves in half an hour, you forgot to pack lunch the night before and the takeaway opportunities at work are sketchy at best? Fear not. Do like this:

1. Put on kettle with just enough water to soften a block of noodles.

2. Heat a pan

3. Chop some garlic sprouts and put in pan with oil. Add some kind of spice that benefits from a bit of sizzling, like Sichuan pepper.

4. Toss some frozen okra in the same pan. Be careful, because the oil will not like this at all and end up everywhere.

5. When the kettle is boiling, pour water over noodles in bowl.

6. Keep stirring pan.

7. Drain noodles and add to pan. Season some more.

8. When the sear on the okra is satisfactory, scrape everything into a box.

9. Fry an egg and put in the box.

10. Finishing touches such as condiments.

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The lunch in all its glory. I got hold of some Taiwanese wheat noodles that are spinach flavored according to the label, but only contain flour, water, salt and food coloring E102 and E133. Those colorants happen to be Tartrazine and Brilliant Blue FCF, both of which are synthesized from petroleum and may be harmful to people with allergies or asthma (And therefore used to be forbidden in Sweden until the EU made a fuss) The two condiment dollops are ssamjang (top) and sambal oelek (bottom).

All of this can be done inside eight minutes. Remove the egg (and perhaps add more vegetables) and you’ll have a vegan lunch instead.

Simple but Fancy Potato Salad

Posted in arugula, cheese, discount, meatballs, potato, salad, sausage, side dish with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 20, 2013 by oskila

My recent blog posts about blue Swedish potatoes are about to get company by one about some rather yellow Danish ones. Today’s main ingredient is Ratte or Asparges potatoes, originating in Denmark according to Wikipedia. They were bought at the same time as the Blue Congo potatoes and at the same shop. Also very cheap for such lovely spuds. The bag claimed they were good for potato salad, so that’s what  I did.

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A batch of asparges potatoes, boiled in their skin along with a vegetable stock cube. I usually run all the potatoes through with a long pin or similar before boiling, to allow some salt in. The asparges potato, when boiled, has an almost creamy texture and a flavor with a lot of nutty notes.

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The protein for the evening. Cheapest possible. Prefab meatballs and discount sausages in order to make sure there was enough potato salad to make a lunch box.

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Salad assembled. Oil, french herbs, powdered garlic, salt, pepper, mayonnaise, potatoes, arugula, diced feta-like cheese and some capers. Heavenly!

Surely this isn’t what they meant by ‘fusion cooking’?

Posted in asian, cabbage, crossover, lotus root, mushroom, noodles, sausage with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 8, 2013 by oskila

I went to a new Asian food store the other day. It’s been there for years, but in the past they’ve mostly seemed to sell silly kitschy stuff. This time I looked closer and found that they had a wide selection of interesting foods, such as very small frozen crabs, fresh pak choi and hundreds of different instant noodles. I managed to tear away with only a bag of instant rice noodles, some frozen lotus root and a small quantity of enoki mushrooms. To get a break from the bacon I decided to combine those with another commonly reoccurring  proteins – sausages.

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Many, but not all of the ingredients; Enoki, green chili, onion, rice noodles, savoy cabbage, frozen lotus root and frozen sausages. While planning the post I had someone comment that it ‘sounds like something someone would cook if they were staying at a Vegan’s house and only brought sausages ‘, which is probably both right and wrong.

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First, soften cabbage and lotus for a little while. If only fried and not parboiled, savoy cabbage takes some effort to digest in my opinion. Half a cube of veggie stock too.

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Fish cabbage and root out and drop the noodles in. This particular brand had no less than four bags of seasoning included, one of which was dried vegetables – a nice addition.

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I heated a pan and dropped the onions and chili in first, then lotus root, cabbage and sausages. After a while the noodles were added (as usual, save the broth!) and enoki for last. I seriously doubt this is the best way to use enoki mushrooms, but at least now I’ve tried and they still look cool. Apart from chili and broth, the only seasoning I added was a splash of Japanese soy and a hint of white pepper/allspice/ginger mix.

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A small helping just to taste it – the rest goes in the lunch box.

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